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Best Suburbs To Buy In Adelaide

Adelaide isn’t always at the forefront of people’s minds when it comes to exciting and trendy places to live, but the South Australian capital is home to some seriously attractive property options and a number of suburbs that anyone would love to live in.

There’s a huge number of factors to take into consideration when you’re trying to decide where you want to buy a home, and it’s hard to keep track of them all when you’re looking at a number of completely different suburbs.

The considerate folks at Canstar have recognised this issue, and so we’ve put together this comprehensive guide to the best suburbs to buy in Adelaide for home buyers and property investors. We’ve mainly broken down the city’s best suburbs for homebuyers by location; however, we’ve also spotlighted a handful of suburbs based on potential rather than position.

If you’re unsure about where to buy in Adelaide – whether for your next home or as an investment property – welcome to your one-stop shop for all the information you need!

Data used was sourced from realestate.com.au and was current at the time of writing.

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5 suburbs within 5km of the CBD

1. Beverley

Where: Beverley was nominated in 2014 as Adelaide’s most affordable suburb within 5km of the CBD. It is home to the Titanium Security Area, previous known as the (far less scary-sounding) Adelaide Arena, home to many of Adelaide’s sports teams.

Public Transport: This area is serviced by a number of bus routes run by the Adelaide Metro, but has no train station.

Schools: Beverly has one school, the primary campus of St Michael’s College, which teaches Reception up to Grade 7, but no high schools.

Shopping and Dining: Beverley has little in the way of retail, but does have a small number of restaurants including a kebab house and a Chinese-Vietnamese fusion restaurant.

Population: As of the 2011 census (ABS), Beverley had a population of 1,413.

Median House Price: $475,750

Median Rent: $300/week

2. Wayville

Where: Best known for its role as host to the annual Royal Adelaide Show, Wayville lies in Adelaide’s inner south and was previously known as Goodwood until 1899.

Public Transport: Wayville has two Glenelg Tram stops: Greenhill Road Tram Stop 1 and Wayville Tram Stop 2. Wayville residents have access to a number of bus routes, with multiple stops on Goodwood Road and Greenhill Road. Additionally, Wayville includes part of the Mike Turtur Bikeway, the busiest cycling commuter route connected to the city.

Schools: Wayville only has one school, Annesley Junior School, an independent, co-ed school with an early learning centre for children aged 2-5 and a primary school for grades Reception up to 6. The suburb also contains a number of tertiary institutions, including Fusion Business College and Central Queensland University Appleton Institution.

Shopping and Dining: Being mainly residential, Wayville doesn’t have a strong or consolidated retail presence, only having a scattered handful of shops throughout the area. Similarly, the area only has a small number of restaurants, including a Japanese restaurant and an Italian restaurant.

Population: As of the 2011 census, Wayville had a population of 1,734.

Median House Price: $867,500

Median Rent: $480/week

3. Malvern

Where: Loved by locals for its abundance of jacaranda trees, and noted by architecture and design enthusiasts for its distinctive, single-storey, wrought iron homes, Malvern is one of the slightly pricier suburbs in Adelaide’s inner south.

Public Transport: A number of Adelaide Metro bus routes run through Malvern, including the 172, 190B, and 170 routes. This suburb has no tram stations.

Schools: Malvern has no schools of its own, relying on the surrounding areas of Unley and Hyde Park, which have a number of schools.

Shopping and Dining: A large number of shops are situated on the stretch of Unley Road that runs through Malvern into the city, including clothing stores, boutiques, hair salons, and homewares stores. The same road is also home to a number of restaurants including Thai and Indochinese establishments; and Malvern also has a number of restaurants further from the main street.

Population: As of the 2011 census, Malvern had a population of 9,504.

Median house price: $1.06 million

Median rent: $445/week

4. Bowden

Where: Established in 1839 as the Village of Bowden, Bowden is a suburb in Adelaide’s inner northwest, located only 3.1km from Adelaide’s city centre.

Public Transport: The suburb is well-serviced by various Adelaide Metro services, with its own train station and a tram line running through the suburb. A number of bus routes also operate here, including routes 250-254 and the N254.

Schools: Bowden’s one school is the Immaculate Heart of Mary Primary School, which teaches Reception up to Grade 7.

Shopping and Dining: While there are a large number of restaurants in the areas surrounding Bowden, the suburb itself only has a handful, including a tavern and a Greek restaurant. Bowden is better off when it comes to shopping, however, being home to a wide variety of retail establishments including homewares stores, a bridal store, clothing shops, and a paint supplies store.

Population: As of the 2011 census, Bowden had a population of 1,241.

Median unit price: $432,000

Median unit rent: $380/week

5. Fitzroy

Where: Located 4km directly north of Adelaide’s city centre, Fitzroy is an affluent and rather small suburb with a housing market comprised mainly of multi-storey mansions and similarly expensive standalone dwellings.

Public Transport: The suburb is serviced by both the G10 and 235 bus routes, and most of the suburb is a comfortable walk from the Ovingham railway station located just outside of Fitzroy.

Schools: Fitzroy is a tiny suburb comprised of only a handful of residential streets, so it has no schools – in fact, it has no non-residential facilities other than several churches.

Shopping and Dining: This suburb relies on surrounding suburbs for shopping, and dining, which can be found in nearby Prospect and North Adelaide.

Population: As of the 2011 census, Fitzroy had a population of 9,430.

Median house price: $1.21 million

Median rent: No data available on realestate.com.au

5 suburbs on the north side

1. Marden

Where: Straddling the line between the north and east sides of Adelaide, Marden is a medium-sized suburb with a housing market comprised of a mix of standalone dwellings and medium-density unit/flat developments.

Public Transport: Marden is serviced by a number of Adelaide Metro bus routes including the 170, 178, and M44 services.

Schools: This suburb has one educational institute, Marden Senior College, which provides SACE and VET courses for students aged 16 years and older.

Shopping and Dining: Marden contains a number of restaurants including a pizza shop and a Chinese restaurant. It also has its own shopping centre, which is currently undergoing a $15 million facelift, which will see the addition of several specialty stores in an attempt to attract a younger crowd.

Population: As of the 2011 census, Marden had a population of 2,342.

Median house price: $650,000

Median rent: $360/week

2. North Adelaide

Where: Sitting just north of Adelaide’s city centre, North Adelaide is a rather trendy, residential suburb situated within the Adelaide Park Lands.

Public Transport: Due to its proximity to the city centre, North Adelaide is extremely well-served by public transport, although the area’s main roads are prone to congestion. North Adelaide has several bus routes that run through it, along with a free loop bus which runs through North Adelaide and the city centre. The suburb has a railway station, but this is less used because it has infrequent services and is located on the suburb’s western edge.

Schools: Schools in North Adelaide include North Adelaide Primary School, and many residential colleges affiliated with the nearby University of Adelaide.

Shopping and Dining: North Adelaide’s O’Connell Street houses a variety of restaurants including Thai, Italian, Mediterranean, Indian, and traditional pubs and hotels. North Adelaide has a respectable number of shopping options including boutiques, clothing stores, specialist bakeries and chocolate stores, and a bookshop.

Population: As of the 2011 census, North Adelaide had a population of 6,678.

Median house price: $860,000

Median rent: $450/week

3. Prospect

Where: Slightly further north of the city centre than Fitzroy, Prospect is a large, family-friendly suburb that gets its name from being deemed a “beautiful prospect” by an 1838 gazeteer (geographical index).

Public Transport: This area benefits from a handful of bus routes including the G10 route, and also features the Islington railway station.

Schools: Educationally, this suburb includes Prospect Primary School, a Catholic primary school, and a private secondary school.

Shopping and Dining: Prospect has a number of restaurants, including two Thai establishments and an Indian restaurant. A vast majority of the restaurants and dining establishments in the area are clustered together on a segment of Prospect Road, the suburb’s main street. That same stretch of road also houses most of the suburb’s retail establishments, including clothing stores, a pet supplies store, a patisserie, and various specialty shops.

Population: As of the 2011 census, Prospect had a population of 13,008.

Median house price: $595,000

Median rent: $390/week

4. Golden Grove

Where: Settled by Captain Adam Robertson and his wife in 1839, the suburb of Golden Grove was created in 1853, and named after the last ship that Robertson commanded. It is situated in the outer north-east of Adelaide.

Public Transport: This suburb has an Adelaide Metro bus interchange, meaning it is well-served as far as public transport goes.

Schools: Schools in this suburb include Golden Grove Primary School and three high schools: Gleeson College, Pedare Christian College, and Golden Grove High School. The three high schools are linked and share a number of facilities and resources.

Shopping and Dining: Golden Grove contains a number of restaurants, including Thai, Chinese, and Indian establishments. The area’s main retail presence is the Golden Grove Village Shopping Centre, with retailers including Big W and Woolworths.

Population: As of the 2011 census, Golden Grove had a population of 9,664.

Median house price: $445,000

Median rent: $360/week

5. Broadview

Where: Part of the City of Prospect in Adelaide’s northeast, Broadview is only 6km away from the city centre, balancing suburban peace and quiet with proximity to the city.

Public Transport: Broadview has a handful of Adelaide Metro services, including the 208 and 208B bus routes.

Schools: St Philip’s Preschool Kindergarten, Nailsworth Primary School, and Hampstead Primary School all fall within Broadview. Residents rely on falling into the catchment area for high schools in surrounding suburbs.

Shopping and Dining: Broadview has very few shops. A number of restaurants are clustered together in the same hub on Regency Road, including two pizzerias, a curry house, and an Asian restaurant.

Population: As of the 2011 census, Broadview had a population of 3,994.

Median house price: $531,250

Median rent: $360/week

5 suburbs on the south side

1. Hyde Park

Where: Hyde Park is an affluent inner-city suburb directly south of Adelaide’s city centre. Potential residents may be disappointed to find that despite its name, this suburb doesn’t actually contain a park.

Public Transport: The suburb has a handful of bus services which run along Unley Road.

Schools: Hyde Park features one educational institute, Walford Anglican, which includes the Walford Early Learning Centre as its Junior School (Reception up to Year 5), a Middle School (Years 6-9), and a Senior School known under the full name of Walford Anglican School For Girls (Years 10-12).

Shopping and Dining: Hyde Park is home to a stretch of King William Road, one of Adelaide’s most notable high streets, which offers a great deal in the way of shops and retail. The handful of restaurants in Hyde Park include two Italian restaurants, a cafe, and a Japanese restaurant.

Population: As of the 2011 census, Hyde Park had a population of 1,781.

Median house price: $1.07 million

Median rent: $500/week

2. Parkside

Where: Less than a kilometer from the city centre, this inner-south suburb is located (true to its name) on the south side of the Adelaide Park Lands.

Public Transport: Parkside has two Adelaide Metro bus routes, the 171 and 172, and most of the suburb is walking distance to the Glenelg tram line.

Schools: Parkside is home to two primary schools, Parkside Primary School and St Raphael’s School.

Shopping and Dining: This suburb is home to stores including a number of clothes shops, a record store, and a homewares store. It also has a wide variety of restaurants, a majority of which sit on the suburb’s western border on Unley Road and the eastern border on Glen Osmond Road.

Population: As of the 2011 census, Parkside had a population of 4,634.

Median house price: $756,000

Median rent: $470/week

3. Goodwood

Where: One of the more slightly more trendy and upmarket suburbs in Adelaide’s inner-south, Goodwood has historically been an incredibly popular suburb, thanks to both its proximity to the city centre and the calibre of its schools. This has led to the suburb becoming a bit of a real estate dream suburb for both investors and owner-occupiers.

Public Transport: This suburb isn’t too poor off as far as public transport goes; Goodwood railway station lies on the western border of the suburb, and there are tram stops a modest walk from the north and the west of Goodwood.

Schools: Goodwood has two schools: Goodwood Primary School and St Thomas School, a private Catholic primary school.

Shopping and Dining: The suburb has a number of shops, a vast majority of which are situated on the suburb’s two main roads, Goodwood Road and King William Road. Retail therapy in Goodwood includes op shops, an art gallery, clothing stores, specialty food stores, and a barber. Many restaurants can also be found on the two main roads, including cafes, pubs, Thai, Chinese, Nepalese, Japanese, Indian, Italian, Vietnamese, Korean, and Latin American.

Population: As of the 2011 census, Goodwood had a population of 2,810.

Median house price: $752,500

Median rent: $445/week

4. Colonel Light Gardens

Where: This wordily-named suburb is only about 6km from the centre of Adelaide, making it a good choice for those who want suburban living that’s still reasonably close to the more lively parts of the city.

Public Transport: This suburb is served by a number of bus routes. Although there are a number of railway stations in surrounding suburbs, many of them are a fair walk away.

Schools: Colonel Light Gardens has two schools: Colonel Light Gardens Primary School, and St Therese, a private Catholic primary school.

Shopping and Dining: Colonel Light Gardens has a vintage clothing store, a gift store, and a pharmacy. It has a handful of restaurants and food establishments, including a café, an Indian restaurant, and a fish and chips shop.

Population: As of the 2011 census, Colonel Light Gardens had a population of 3,311.

Median house price: $731,750

Median rent: $430/week

5. Clapham

Where: Roughly 8km directly south of the city centre, Clapham is a predominantly residential suburb named after the London district of the same name.

Public Transport: Clapham is served by the nearby Torrens Park and Lynton railway stations, along with the 300 and 952 bus routes.

Schools: There is just one school here, Clapham Primary School, which teaches Years Reception to 7.

Shopping and Dining: There are only two shops in the suburb of Clapham: a gift store and a butcher. Similarly, the suburb has only one dining option, Eire Café. Residents may have to travel outside of Clapham for their retail and food fixes.

Population: As of the 2011 census, Clapham had a population of 1,616.

Median house price: $606,000

Median rent: $395/week

5 suburbs on the east side

1. Rosslyn Park

Where: Roughly 6km east of the Adelaide city centre, Rosslyn Park was originally a series of vineyards owned by an English emigrant. When he died in 1870, the following years saw the land subdivided and sold for residential purposes.

Public Transport: Rosslyn Park has no railway station, but is well-served by various bus services, including the H22, H20, H23, and 141 routes.

Schools: Rosslyn Park itself contains no schools; however, St Peters Girls School and Norwood Morialta High School’s Senior Campus are just outside this suburb.

Shopping and Dining: This suburb has a number of shops, including a handful of wine shops and a record store. It also has a small number of restaurants, including the Penfolds Magill Estate Restaurant and a pizzeria on its southern border.

Population: As of the 2011 census, Rosslyn Park had a population of 1,460.

Median house price: $823,000

Median rent: $483/week

2. Hazelwood Park

Where: Situated approximately 5km east of Adelaide’s city centre, Hazelwood Park as a suburb is slightly upmarket and mainly residential. Greenhill Road runs through it, with residential properties and Hazelwood Park (the park itself) to the north and the foothills of the Mount Lofty Ranges to the south.

Public Transport: This area has a handful of bus routes, including the 142, 147, 820, and 821. A majority of Hazelwood Park residents use cars for the majority of their transportation needs.

Schools: Hazelwood Park has no schools of its own, but the Burnside and Linden Park primary schools are nearby.

Shopping and Dining: Hazelwood Park has a small shopping complex on Glynburn Road. In the vicinity of this complex are a handful of specialty stores including a wine broker, a gym, and a pilates studio. The same area is same to many of Hazelwood Park’s restaurants, including a pizzeria, a Thai restaurant, and a café.

Population: As of the 2011 census, Hazelwood Park had a population of 1,968.

Median house price: $910,250

Median rent: $400/week

3. Beaumont

Where: Founded in 1848 as a purpose-built village, this suburb took its name from a notable house constructed in 1850 for Augustus Short, Adelaide’s first Anglican bishop. Beaumont House still stands today, and is now owned by the National Trust of South Australia.

Public Transport: Beaumont has a small number of bus routes, including the 142, 147, and 627. This suburb has no railway station.

Schools: Beaumont has no schools of its own, relying on schools found in nearby suburbs.

Shopping and Dining: There’s only one store in the suburb, which is a florist. Similarly, Beaumont has no restaurants, although there is a café nearby to the west.

Population: As of the 2011 census, Beaumont had a population of 2,490.

Median house price: $850,000

Median rent: $475/week

4. Glenunga

Where: The suburb where the iconic Hills Hoist clothes line was invented, Glenunga is located roughly 5km southeast of Adelaide’s city centre. It is named for its proximity to Glen Osmond – in the local Aboriginal dialect, “unga” means near.

Public Transport: A large number of different Adelaide Metro buses run along the eastern and western borders of the suburb, which are Glen Osmond Road and Portrush Road respectively. No buses run through this suburb.

Schools: Glenunga International High School is well known, and Linden Park Primary School is located just to the east for junior residents.

Shopping and Dining: Glenunga has a wide variety of retail and dining, all of which sit on the two main roads. Its numerous restaurants include Indian, Chinese, Thai, Mexican, and Italian restaurants.

Population: As of the 2011 census, Glenunga had a population of 1,867.

Median house price: $890,000

Median rent: $538/week

5. Burnside

Where: Not to be confused with the City of Burnside, SA, Burnside the suburb is a local government area. Burnside was one of Adelaide’s first suburbs and as a result is home to some seriously grand and historic buildings.

Public Transport: A number of bus routes run in Burnside, including the 141, 142, 580, 821, 822, 871, and 872 services.

Schools: Burnside features Burnside Primary School, but no high schools, with residents presumably looking to the nearby St Peters Girls School or Marryatville High School.

Shopping and Dining: Burnside the suburb is home to very few shops, but the City of Burnside features the Burnside Village shopping centre (a few suburbs over in Glenside), which is a main retail hub for the region. A handful of restaurants sit on the suburb’s eastern border, including a café and a pizzeria.

Population: As of the 2011 census, Burnside had a population of 2,671.

Median house price: $863,250

Median rent: $488/week

5 suburbs on the west side

1. Novar Gardens

Where: Sitting just south of Adelaide Airport, this suburb was meant to be named Morphettville, but the name was changed in honour of Ronald Munro Ferguson, 1st Viscount Novar, who was the Governor-General of Australia in 1914-1920.

Public Transport: Bus services in Novar Gardens include the 167, 168, J7, and J8 services.

Schools: The suburb is home to two schools: Immanuel Primary School and Immanuel College.

Shopping and Dining: The suburb has next to no shops or restaurants, with only a catering company and an IGA falling within the suburb’s borders.

Population: As of the 2011 census, Novar Gardens had a population of 2,325.

Median house price: $597,750

Median rent: $430/week

2. Henley Beach South

Where: A favourite for older couples and families, Henley Beach South is a coastal suburb near the westernmost point of the Torrens River.

Public Transport: Henley Beach South offers a lot in terms of public transport, with bus routes including the H22, H32, 654,671, H30, N30, and X30 – among others.

Schools: Henley Beach Primary School is located within the suburb; however, Henley Beach South has no high school.

Shopping and Dining: This area has a small number of shops, including a jewellery store and a grocery store. In terms of dining establishments, Henley Beach South has a handful of cafes, Italian, Thai, and Indian restaurants.

Population: As of the 2011 census, Henley Beach South had a population of 2,502.

Median house price: $823,500

Median rent: $500/week

3. Richmond

Where: Named after the first farm established in the area in 1839, Richmond is an affordable, residential suburb in Adelaide’s inner-west.

Public Transport: Buses in Richmond include the 100, 101, H20, 167, 168, and 720 services.

Schools: Richmond is home to one educational institute, Tenison Woods Catholic School, which teaches Years Reception to 7.

Shopping and Dining: Richmond is a larger suburb with a number of stores, including a florist, a cinema, a BCF, a hair salon, and an arts and craft store. Richmond has a confectionery store and a café, but most of the area’s restaurants are just outside of this suburb.

Population: As of the 2011 census, Richmond had a population of 3,071.

Median house price: $475,000

Median rent: $375/week

4. Seaton

Where: Home to the Royal Adelaide Golf Club, Seaton is a large-ish suburb located roughly 9km east of Adelaide’s city centre.

Public Transport: The suburb is well-served by public transport, with available buses including the 115, 117, 155, 661, 372, 300, 653, and 654 services.

Schools: Seaton has two public, co-ed schools, Seaton Park Primary School and Seaton High School.

Shopping and Dining: Due to its relatively large size, Seaton’s various stores and restaurants are somewhat scattered. In terms of retail, they have a paint supplies store, a patisserie, and a cycle store, among others. As far as Seaton’s restaurants go, it has several including a pizzeria, a handful of cafes, Indian, and Chinese.

Population: As of the 2011 census, Seaton had a population of 9,845.

Median house price: $475,000

Median rent: $380/week

5. Torrensville

Where: Only 2km west of Adelaide’s city centre, Torrensville was named after Robert Torrens, the third Premier of South Australia.

Public Transport: Torrensville has plenty of public transport, with buses running through the suburb along three main roads: Ashwin Parade, Ashley Street, and Henley Beach Road. Some of the bus routes in this area include the 286, 287, H20, H30, and INDB services.

Schools: Torrensville has two schools: Thebarton Senior College and Torrensville Primary School.

Shopping and Dining: Henley Beach Road, which runs through the bottom of Torrensville, has become a vibrant hub for dining and shopping in recent years, and is home to a number of different stores and restaurants.

Population: As of the 2011 census, Torrensville had a population of 3,867.

Median house price: $545,000

Median rent: $390/week

5 beachside suburbs

1. Henley Beach

Where: Possibly the most sought-after of Adelaide’s numerous beachside suburbs, Henley Beach is a suburb that balances trendy popularity with down-to-earth living. This attraction comes with a not-insignificant price tag attached, naturally.

Public Transport: The area has a number of Adelaide Metro bus services, including the H30/X30, 286, 287, H22, H32, and 300.

Schools: Henley Beach has several schools, including St Michael’s College, Fulham North Primary School, Henley High School, and Fulham Gardens Primary School.

Shopping and Dining: While Henley Beach doesn’t have too much in the way of shopping, it has an abundance of beachfront dining options, including cafes, a wine bar, Thai and Greek restaurants, and various pubs and hotels.

Population: As of the 2011 census, Henley Beach had a population of 5,562.

Median house price: $838,000

Median rent: $485/week

2. Grange

Where: This suburb was originally named The Grange, after a cottage belonging to Charles Sturt, the man who discovered much of Adelaide. It’s perfect for retired types who like a spot of golf, as about a third of the suburb is taken up by the golf club!

Public Transport: Grange is well-served by public transport, with a train line running through Grange’s middle and buses including the 300, 663, B10, 288, 371, 650, and H30 services.

Schools: Grange has one school, called Grange Primary.

Shopping and Dining: Grange doesn’t offer much in the way of shopping, but it has a number of restaurants including various cafes, hotels and pubs, Thai, Indian, and Italian.

Population: As of the 2011 census, Grange had a population of 5,857.

Median house price: $683,250

Median rent: $420/week

3. West Beach

Where: West Beach started life as a series of sand hills but was designated a new suburb in 1929. It lies directly to the west of Adelaide Airport, and similarly to other nearby suburbs, it is almost 50% golf course. West Beach is also the home of the Mega Adventure Park theme park and the Adelaide Shores Resort.

Public Transport: Despite its slightly larger size, almost every nook and cranny of the suburb has a Adelaide Metro bus route.

Schools: It has one school, West Beach Primary School.

Shopping and Dining: West Beach has a handful of shops, including a bottle shop and a clothing store. The suburb also has a small number of dining establishments, including a handful of cafes, a seafood takeaway place, and a pizzeria. And as we mentioned, there’s always the theme park and the resort for those with a family to entertain.

Population: As of the 2011 census, West Beach had a population of 4,484.

Median house price: $749,000

Median rent: $450/week

4. Tennyson

Where: One of the smaller and more unusually-shaped suburbs on our list, Tennyson is comprised of a thin strip of land separated from the mainland proper. No part of the suburb is more than 400m from a beach, which may be part of the reason for its higher house prices.

Public Transport: Tennyson only has one main road but it has no less than four bus routes: the 372, 651, 652, and B12 services.

Schools: Due to the nature of the suburb, Tennyson has no schools, shops, or restaurants.

Shopping and Dining: See above.

Population: As of the 2011 census, Tennyson had a population of 1,112.

Median house price: $1.06 million

Median rent: $585/week

5. Seacliff

Where: A medium-sized suburb where you’ll never be more than a 5- or 10-minute walk from the beach, Seacliff is a mainly residential suburb popular among established families and the elderly.

Public Transport: Seacliff has plenty of public transport, with a railway station at its centre and buses including the 265, 957, 681, 720, and 777.

Schools: Seacliff has one school, Seacliff Primary School.

Shopping and Dining: Seacliff only has a handful of stores, including a party supplies store, a homewares store, and a couple of grocery stores. Its dining offerings are similarly scarce; Seacliff has a café and a hotel.

Population: As of the 2011 census, Seacliff had a population of 1,954.

Median house price: $722,000

Median rent: $400/week

5 suburbs forecast to increase in value

1. Semaphore Park

Where: If you’re after beachside living but don’t have the hugest of budgets, Semaphore Park might be the suburb for you.

Public Transport: Adelaide Metro buses run through the majority of the suburb, including the 157, 655, 657, and 117 routes.

Schools: Semaphone Park has one school, Westport Primary School.

Shopping and Dining: Semaphone Park offers little to nothing in the way of shopping; however, it does have a handful of cafes and a takeaway food place.

Population: As of the 2011 census, Semaphore Park had a population of 4,225.

Median house price: $500,000

Median rent: $420/week

2. Brighton

Where: One of Adelaide’s more popular and bustling beachside suburbs, living in Brighton gives you the best of both worlds. A wide variety of cafes and stores help it avoid feeling too isolated or backwards, but the beachside setting makes every day feel like a holiday.

Public Transport: Brighton has plenty of public transport options, with its own railway station and a number of bus routes including the 262, 265, 320, 681, and 720 services.

Schools: This area’s main school is the Brighton Primary School.

Shopping and Dining: Brighton has a number of specialty stores including clothing shops, boutiques, bakeries, a homewares store, and a pet shop. It’s no slouch in the dining area either, having Laotian, South Asian, Nepalese, Italian, Thai, and Chinese restaurants.

Population: As of the 2011 census, Brighton had a population of 3,397.

Median house price: $715,000

Median rent: $395/week

3. Cowandilla

Where: A rather tiny suburb in Adelaide’s inner-west, Cowandilla is cut into two rectangles by Sir Donald Bradman Drive, a major road in the area.

Public Transport: Due to the size of the suburb, the 163 bus route is Cowandilla’s only form of public transport; it’s a tiny suburb so residents report this is more than sufficient.

Schools: The area has one school, Cowandilla Primary School & Children’s Centre.

Shopping and Dining: Cowandilla has a clothing store, but that’s about it for retail fun; but surrounding suburbs have plenty of stores, and they’re only a small walk away. Cowandilla has two restaurants: an Italian restaurant and a charcoal chicken restaurant.

Population: As of the 2011 census, Cowandilla had a population of 1,355.

Median house price: $506,000

Median rent: $390/week

4. Exeter

Where: Sitting in between Semaphore Beach and Port Creek, Exeter is a smallish suburb located in Adelaide’s north-west.

Public Transport: Peterhead Railway Station lies in the top-right corner of the suburb. There aren’t any buses in Exeter.

Schools: Exeter has no schools of its own.

Shopping and Dining: Exeter has only a handful of stores, which include a BWS, a bookstore, a furniture store, and a shoe shop. The suburb has one café.

Population: As of the 2011 census, Exeter had a population of 1,097.

Median house price: $425,000

Median rent: $375/week

5. Hilton

Where: Hilton is Cowandilla’s next-door neighbour and it is almost identical in shape, size, and composition. So if you like the idea of living somewhere small and simple, but just that little bit closer to the city centre, Hilton could be the spot for you.

Public Transport: Identically to Cowandilla, the suburb’s only public transport is the 163 bus route that runs along Sir Donald Bradman Drive.

Schools: Hilton has no schools.

Shopping and Dining: In terms of retail, Hilton offers clothing shops, a bottle shop, a fine foods store, an audio equipment store, and more. It has a seafood/yiros restaurant, a café, and a handful of bistro-style places.

Population: As of the 2006 census, Hilton had a population of 807. (2011 census data unavailable)

Median house price: $508,000

Median rent: $373/week

If reading about any of these 35 suburbs has convinced you to pursue a home in the area, why not let Canstar help you find the perfect home loan to finance your new house?

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Sponsored products are paid advertisements and do not include all providers. Canstar receives a fee for referring you to the advertiser. Canstar is not giving you advice in relation to sponsored products.

Products displayed above that are not “Sponsored” are sorted as referenced in the introductory text and then alphabetically by company. Canstar may receive a fee for referral of leads from these products. See How We Get Paid for further information.

Canstar is an information provider and in giving you product information Canstar is not making any suggestion or recommendation about a particular product. If you decide to apply for a home loan, you will deal directly with a financial institution not with Canstar. Rates and product information should be confirmed with the relevant financial institution. Home Loans in the table include only products that are available for somebody borrowing 80% of the total loan amount. For product information, read our detailed disclosure, important notes and additional information. Read the comparison rate warning. The results do not include all providers and may not compare all the features available to you. Canstar may earn a fee for referral of leads from the comparison table. See how we get paid.

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