Support For Farmers In Disasters And Drought

Farmers will now have access to more simplified information about localized support during natural disasters and drought, thanks to a new website developed by the Queensland Farmers’ Federation (QFF) and funded by the Queensland Government.

Queensland farmers have been described as the cornerstone of the state – but it’s an industry that can face multiple challenges and, in the instance of climate, these challenges can be sudden and unexpected.

The Queensland Farmers’ Federation (QFF) has developed a fantastic online resource that presents the full cross-section of postcode specific financial and social well-being support available to farmers and primary producers. You can find it at www.farmerdisastersupport.org.au.

Agriculture Minister Leanne Donaldson commended the QFF.

“During this record drought we have expanded financial and other assistance beyond farm business support to help farming families and farm communities,” Ms Donaldson said.

“This project has been funded from the Queensland Government’s Communities Assistance package and provides a handy central source to access the range of organisations providing assistance.”

QFF CEO Ruth Wade said the website allowed farmers and primary producers to input their postcode, select their industry and then see results and services specific to their local area which prioritises on-farm and industry specific advice and support.

“It can often be confusing and overwhelming when trying to access assistance during drought and natural disasters. Much of the assistance on offer comes from a variety of organisations and different levels of government and these can often be difficult to navigate,” Ms Wade said.

“What this website is designed to do is collate all these services and support networks into an easily negotiable, up to data set of localized results.

“QFF has worked closely with the Queensland Government and its industry member organisations to ensure we have delivered a service that will help everyday farmers access the support that is available to them.”

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An Exciting Time for Australian Agriculture

Assistant Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources, Senator Anne Ruston, recently joined industry and academia at the Outlook 2016 conference to examine the future of agriculture.

Minister Ruston said the Turnbull Coalition Government has a vision for a prosperous, productive and innovative agriculture sector.

“The opportunities for the agriculture sector are tremendous, and I have good reason to be full of optimism for the future,” Minister Ruston said.

“Australia has world-class farmers who are able to capitalise on the fortunate position we are in.

“We are neighbours with the strongest growing region in the world, we have world-renowned clean and green credentials, a strong economy, modern technology and a skilled workforce.”

Minister Ruston said ongoing growth in global demand for food and fibre is delivering huge opportunities for Australia.

“According to ABARES, growth in global food demand alone will require a 75 per cent increase in global food production by 2050 compared with 2007 levels,” Minister Ruston said.

“Australia is well-placed to take advantage of this growing demand, much of which will come from our neighbours and existing trading partners in Asia.

“It also reflects a growing international market for the kind of high-value produce and expertise at which Australia excels.

“This demand presents tremendous opportunities, but it’s also important that we aren’t complacent and continually strive to do business better, while maintaining Australia’s high biosecurity standards.”

Agri Exports Growing

According to figures released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics for the December quarter, rural exports are flourishing. Exports increased by 10% to $10.7 billion in the December quarter, while real services exports rose 1.6 per cent.

The Minister for Trade and Investment, Steven Ciobo, said that this was an indication that progress is being made in rebalancing the economy post the resources boom.

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