Christmas Gift ideas for your dog, cat & bird!

According to a Lorraine Lea survey into the Christmas gift giving habits of Australians in 2015, more than 1 in 4 of us wrapped a present for our cat or dog during the festive season.

It seems that Santa Claus is fond of pets, with the survey of more than 2,500 Australians confirming that we are more likely to buy the family pet a Christmas gift (28% of people surveyed) than a fellow co-worker (21%). The results showed that 60% of Australians had already started their Christmas Shopping by October, with only 5% of people leaving their gift buying to the last minute.

Lorraine Lea company director Adrian Ryan said the majority of Australians start shopping months in advance in order to find a meaningful gift for their loved ones.

“While gift cards might be the go-to solution for last minute shoppers, it seems that most people still prefer to give and receive a well-thought present. Although according to research, you may need to choose them wisely; more than 50% of people admit to having re-gifted an unwanted Christmas present in the past.” Mr. Ryan said.

The results show that of people surveyed…

pampering pets at christmas 82% prefer to give a gift rather than a gift card
63% prefer to receive a tangible gift rather than a gift card
72% spent at least $80 on their partner last Christmas
56% spent less than $60 on another family member last year
55% spent more than $80 on one child last year
28% buy Christmas presents for their pets
21% give gifts to co-workers
68% said they prefer to receive ‘Season’s Greetings’ via a traditional hand-written Christmas card than an email, SMS or Facebook message

Source: Lorraine Lea 2015 Christmas Gift Giving Survey

As to how much we actually spend on our fur-babies, it appears we spend around $780 million on pet pampering over the course of a year – it?s reasonable to expect that a chunk of that would be Christmas-season related. According to the Australian Securities and Investment Commission (ASIC), Aussies plan on spending $1,079 on average over the holiday season, so how much of that is spent on our furry friends?

“Pets really are part of the family clan and the growing trend of including them on the Christmas shopping list each year is becoming the norm,” said then-CEO of ANRA, Margy Osmond. “Of those who will buy a gift for the family pet the average spend will be around $21.63 and men will spend one and a half times more than women on gifts ($27.77 for men compared to $17.75 for women).”

And an RSPCA poll in the UK last Christmas found that around one in five pet owners expected to spend more on their pet than their mother-in-law at Christmas. Ouch!

When it comes to the ideal gift for our furred or feathered companions, the Australian Veterinary Association (AVA) has compiled a useful list.

christmas gift for pet For Dogs…
  • A fancy dog tag and comfy collar is a great gift. It can also help provide a source of identification if your pooch escapes the garden
  • A new Frisbee or rubber ball means both you and your best friend can spend time together and get exercise.
  • A pair of Doggles. For the discerning hounds, consider a pair of Doggles (sunglasses for dogs), which make a great novelty gift.

 

christmas gifts for cats For Cats…
  • Cats love cat caves – they take cat beds to a whole new level and many are made from eco-friendly material.
  • Cats also love scratching, so a new scratching post or hanging catnip toy in the shape of a fish or mouse.

 

christmas gifts for bird For Birds…
  • A new bird swing or mirror. In fact why not go all out and redecorate the cage?
  • A healthy hanging munch ball can be a yummy Christmas treat.

It’s clear our pets can tend to be quite pampered over the Christmas season. However, it’s important to remember that you don’t have to spend hundreds of $$ on your pets to show that you love them. The good news is, none of the above options are very expensive, perhaps leaving more $$ to put towards some of the more neglected gift recipients on your list, like your co-workers…

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